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Henry Stone

Jul 312014
 
Joe Stone Miami Bass

Joe Stone, in Henry Stone’s recording studio

Henry Stone Music’s own Joe Stone recently spoke to Miami New Times about his history with the Miami Bass style of music.

Joe was instrumental to the genre through his work with L’Trimm with “Cars That Go Boom,” and Guci Crew II with “Sally That Girl,” as well as many other hits that came out on various Henry Stone labels from that era.

Even today those songs have been sampled and resampled, appeared on movie soundtracks, and in commercials and still make up an essentiali portion of our catalog to this day.

Here’s the first couple of lines from the article and a link so that you can go to the newspaper’s website and check it out for yourself.

“Miami is the undisputed world heavyweight champion of bass, and the globe’s leading progenitor of trunk rattle, rear-view shake, and total body thump.

The genre is a direct descendent of Pretty Tony’s freestyle productions, and Henry Stone’s earlier indie R&B Pop. It’s the single hardest electronic boom in the universe, and we’re proud.

Joe Stone, son of kingpin Henry, helped bring that hard-knock Miami bass baby into the world. And alongside a talented bevvy of behind-the-scenes players from Orlando to the MIA, he was there turning knobs and flipping switches to drop the first extended 808 kick that set it all off.”

Click the linke to read the rest of the article on Miami New Times

Dec 052013
 

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Lookout Wynwood! Mysterious Henry Stone street art posters have been taking over the neighborhood as Art Basel Miami 2013 descends on the city.

We don’t know who the crusaders putting these up are, but it’s good to know that as the eyes of the world are upon Miami this week, that the creator of the Miami Sound of music will be recognized too.

If you don’t know, Henry Stone is a pioneer in R&B, soul, funk, disco, dance, and hip hop music. He produced the first version of The Twist, and wrote a song covered by Frank Sinatra. He was friends with Leonard Chess, and the first distributor for Atlantic Records.

From recording Ray Charles in a warehouse on Flagler street in 1951, to discovering Sam&Dave, Betty Wright, Little Beaver, Latimore, George McCrae, KC & The Sunshine Band, Timmy Thomas, Blowlfy, Willie Clarke, and many more, Henry Stone is a giant in the world of modern music history.

From being James Brown’s Godfather, to selling hundreds of millions of records around the globe, Henry Stone has never lost the flavor of the streets of the City of Miami, and now they bear his face in tribute to that legacy.

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Dec 032013
 
The Paradise Garage

The Paradise Garage

I remember when the dance club DJs first started in New York City. It was in the 1970s when I hired Ray Caviano to promote my TK Disco 12″‘s. He was in charge of basically the New York office. And he got all my new music played in all the hottest New York nightclubs. Let’s call him now, he’ll give you the whole history 

(Henry dials the phone)

Ray Caviano: Hello? Heeeenry Stooooneeeee!

Henry Stone: Hey, Ray Caviano, just the man I wanteda talk to! We’re gonna do a blog on the original DJs from New York….

Ray Caviano: Well some of the main guys were Jim Burgess, Roy Thode aka The Saint, Richie Kaczor from Studio 54, Richie Rivera, Larry Levan from Paradise Garage. And Bobby DJ, he was one of the originals. These were some of the main guys at the original New York dance clubs in the 1970′s.
 
Larry Levan was the man of the scene of the Paradise Garage. He perfected the sound. He was very responsible for breaking dance music in the city. The Paradise Garage was the most exclusive club. All the radio power players were there to see what was breaking on the dance floor. Just anybody couldn’t walk in there. It was a very private, very special place. And they didn’t serve liquor.
 
It was about 1977 that it opened, and it really set the trend until the early 80′s.

There was also David Mancuso, who started a club called The Loft, which was around before The Paradise Garage. David was one of the key people that started private dance parties in the New York area. He was tight with Judy Weinstein who was very important with her For The Record record pool. She serviced about 150 DJ’s, and she always got 150 copies of each new TK Disco release.
 
I was there.


 
I would do the whole circuit with all the new TK Disco records. Four or five clubs a night, just about every night of the week.

I was a VIP everywhere I went, fuhgettaboutit. Most people could never ever get in to Studio 54, but I walked right in anytime I wanted, straight to the DJ, who would always smile when they saw me cause they knew I had that new TK Disco for them to play.

We were the hottest in the game.
 
I first met and was recruited by Henry Stone through our mutual friend Allen Grubman. I was working on other records for him, dance records. Me and Tommy Mottola. Songs like “Turn The Beat Around” by Vicky Sue Robinson. Allen Grubman introduced me to Henry Stone and the rest is history.
 
Nowadays radio doesn’t play new music. Back then, clubs were the testing ground for all new potential hits in the market. Hot club songs became hot radio songs became hit records. That doesn’t exist anymore the way it did.
 
But for the club DJ’s, it’s the same formula: make sure everybody is dancing and having a good time. The culture of the DJ and the essence is still the same. That party energy, that excitement is the same. And people are still dancing and celebrating. The experience is the same, there’s just new technology. It’s totally different, but it’s fundamentally the same.

Nov 142013
 

The Billion Dollar BandThe Billion Dollar Band
Available for download
01 Get In the Groove
02 Candy Girl
03 Love’s Sweet Notions
04 Big Time Spender
05 Without Your Lovin’
06 I Like Whatcha’ Doin’
07 Smiling Morning Love
08 Let’s Just Be Friends
09 Our Love
10 Money Don’t Grow On Trees

This rare one and only album release of pure 1970′s Miami Soul, R&B from The Billion Dollar Band Featuring Miami Horns with Mike Lewis The Miami Strings with Bernie Marks. If you like Earth Wind & Fire you will love the Billion Dollar Band.

iTunes

Nov 132013
 

When Steve Alaimo was in college he had a band called the Redcoats. Around that time, he started hangin’ around with me as a promotion man, sort of a hangaround guy, and I’d take him up to Ernie Busker’s place, the Palms Of Hallandale to see BB King and James Brown. I think it really influenced his sound and the way he sung and the way he performed. Man, Steve was great on stage.

Later I got him on as the opener for James Brown for a stadium show in Miami, and after the gig James said to me “Don’t ever let that whiteboy on before me again.” That’s how good Steve was. James didn’t want him stealing any of his thunder.

When he was first starting out he played rooms like The Eden Roc on Miami Beach and later the big room at the Diplomat Hotel. He was doing standards, show tunes, good ol music, yaknow…music.

William Morris was the first agency to handle him and one of his first agents was Famous Amos. That’s what he did before the cookies, he was Steve’s talent agent at the William Morris Agency.

I’d say that Steve was really the first blue eyed soul singer to come along yaknow.

Sincerely,

Henry Stone

Nov 052013
 

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Sam Moore came down and did the interview for my movie “Rock Your Baby.” He was in the group Sam & Dave, who are the biggest selling duo in the history of music.

I used to see em’ play over at the King Of Hearts in Liberty City. Guy named John Lomelo owned the club and was also basically their manager.

Steve Alaimo worked with Sam and Dave here in Miami. He worked the clubs like the Knight Beat and The King Of Hearts with them. And then he produced some records on them for my Alston and Marlin Records that ended up on Roulette. Those were the first sides they ever cut. Later I was instrumental on their recording with Isaac Hayes and David Porter down at Stax for Atlantic, but that’s another story.

You’ll hear all about it in the movie.

Steve went down to a little club in Downtown Miami and met up with Sam Moore there and my movie director Mark Moorman and his film crew, and they shot some helluva scene there. Steve was the one who really produced their records down here. They also filmed at the Criteria Studios yknow, now it’s called the Hit Factory. That’s where they cut some of those Alston and Marlin records that ended up on Roulette.

Steve said it went over very good. They were just talking about old times, talkin about Sam Cooke and some of the old artists that used to come down.They said the filming went very good. Mark Moorman the director was very happy

I havent spoken to Sam Moore in 50 years now. I’m really happy for his success. He’s still out there. Still working. Apparently doing real good for himself.

The reports I’m getting on the film is that they’re just about through filming. The next phase is the editing and the post production, which, should start immediately yaknow.

The film should be released by the middle of 2014.

Oct 252013
 

On Tuesday, October 12, the Miami-produced “Art Loft” show on WPBT2 public television, did a segment on Henry Stone and the upcoming “Rock Your Baby” documentary film. In this episode of art loft, host Kalyn James and the art loft crew bring you a Miami music legend look back on a fascinating life and the music from Miami that changed the world.


Oct 142013
 

On October 12, 2013, at the newly renovated Milander Performance Center, over 1200 disco fans gathered for one big night of the Miami Disco Fever Reunion! Organized by long-time promoter Charlie Rodriguez and hosted by popular radio DJ Leo Vela, the night featured performances from some of the biggest names in disco, including George McCrae, Timmy Thomas, Jimmy ‘Bo’ Horne, as well as a KC and the Sunshine Band tribute by the Old Skool Gang.

Henry Stone, the legendary founder of TK Records and many other labels, received a proclamation from the Mayor of the City of Hialeah, Carlos Hernandez. Mayor Hernandez is himself a big fan of TK Records and joined in with the people who packed the dance floor throughout the night. The day of October 12, 2013 was proclaimed as the official TK Records Day in Hialeah.

Henry Stone’s labels throughout the 1970s cranked out hundreds of hot tracks and included over 25 gold and platinum records, all from a little studio in the upstairs of his distributor warehouse in Hialeah. Some of his biggest acts included George McCrae on TK Records, KC and the Sunshine Band on on TK Records, Latimore on Glades, Bobby Caldwell on Clouds, Gwen McCrae on Cat, Foxy on on Dash, Jimmy “Bo” Horne on Sunshine Sound, Anita Ward on Juana, Timmy Thomas on Glades, Betty Wright on Alston, T-Connection on Dash, Peter Brown on Drive and too many more to list. Dozens of artists passed through his doors throughout his 60+ years in the music business and Henry’s impact on both the music and the business has been felt throughout the world.

The Miami Disco Fever Reunion on October 12, 2013 was a fitting tribute to a man who has done so much for the music business.

Click here to see more photos


Photos Courtesy Jake Katel

Oct 142013
 

October 12, 2013 Proclaimed TK Records Day in Hialeah, Florida

The Miami Disco Fever Reunion took place on October 12, 2013 at the Milander Performing Arts Center in Hialeah. Organized by Charlie Rodriguez Live Entertainment and hosted by Leo Vela, several TK Disco artists performed including George McCrae, Timmy Thomas, Jimmie Bo Horne, and the Old Skool Gang did a KC and the Sunshine Band tribute.

Henry Stone received a proclamation from City of Hialeah Mayor Carlos Hernandez declaring it TK Records Day! Well over 1000 people danced and partied the night away to some of the best music from the 70s disco era. Full text of the proclamation below the image.

hialeahproclamation

Proclamation
Whereas: The City of Hialeah is proud to recognize TK Records. This record company was an American record label started by record distributor Henry Stone in Miami, Florida. TK Records is one of several labels that he founded in the 1960s and 1970s. It distributed disco star KC and the Sunshine Band until 1981.

Whereas: TK Records is closely associated with soul/R&B and the early rise of Disco music, being the label on which the second bona fide disco song (after the Hues Corporation’s “Rock The Boat”) to reach #1 on the pop music charts was released. Other artists who had an impact on the label or on one of its many subidiary labels include Betty Wright (on Alston), Benny Latimore (Glades), Peter Brown (Drive), Foxy, Kracker (Dash), Jimmy ‘Bo’ Horne (Sunshine Sound), Timmy Thomas (Glades), Gwen McCrae (Cat), T-Connection (Dash), Bobby Caldwell (Clouds), and Anita Ward (Juana). Within a couple of years, TK’s notability in disco music would be surpassed by other labels, such as Casablanca Records and RSO Records, but, in the early years, TK was undoubtedly in the top tier of the disco genre.

Now, Therefore: I, Carlos Hernandez, Mayor of the City of Hialeah, under the power and authority vested in me, do hereby solemnly proclaim this Saturday, 12th day of October, 2013, as:

TK Records Day

In Hialeah, and urge our more than 225,000 residents to join me in honoring this event.
In Witness Whereof, I have herunto set my hand and caused the Great Seal of the City of Hialeah to be affixed this 12th day of October 2013.

Carlos Hernandez
Mayor

Oct 032013
 

Top 10 KC & The Sunshine Band Hits from TK Records

KC & The Sunshine Band

KC & The Sunshine Band

KC and The Sunshine Band are one of the world’s most popular musical groups. With 2 songs on the Saturday Night Fever movie soundtrack, 9 Grammy nominations, 3 Grammy awards, 5 Billboard #1 pop singles, and incredibly influential dance music staples like “Shake Shake Shake (Shake Your Booty),” “I’m Your Boogie Man,” “Keep It Comin Love,” and “That’s The Way I Like It,” to name a few, their music has been a worldwide sensation since first hitting the mainstream in the 1970′s.

The group was born in Hialeah, FL from the combination of  label owner Henry Stone’s industry prowess, the open door policy that kept his company full of Miami’s most talented musicians, the teamwork between young engineer Rick Finch, and songwriter Harry Wayne Casey (KC for short), and the influence of Caribbean rhythms on dancey, bass heavy American r&b.

Here are KC & The Sunshine Band’s Top 10 Hits on Henry Stone’s TK Records.

10. Please Don’t Go

In 1980, this smooth ballad was a worldwide number one hit. Women from Kansas City to Tokyo fell hard for the pleading vocals and bought literally tons of copies of it.

9. Keep It Comin Love

You may have heard this song in the soundtrack to the movies Howard Stern’s Private Parts (1997), Blow (2001), Inside Deep Throat (2005), Wedding Crashers (2005), and Freak Out (2006). The track was very popular thanks to its driving beat and sexual double entendres.

8. Queen Of Clubs

It was a number one record in the UK. The band supported it out there playing 2 or 3 shows a night. Steve Alaimo took him out there. And it was recorded before all the big #1 pop hits.

7. Sound Your Funky Horn

This was one of the early recordings too before the big hits. KC and his little junkanoo band played it at one of Clarence Reid’s weddings. Not too many people know about it, but it’s a good little record. It came out on Jay Boy Records in the UK. Clarence Reid co-wrote it with KC.

6. That’s The Way I Like It

This single from KC & The Sunshine Band’s second album is one of only a few pop hits in history to go #1 on the charts in non consecutive weeks. At the time it was released some people considered it risqué due to the subject matter suggested by the lyrics. It was huge around the world, from Norway to the UK to the USA.

5. Shotgun Shuffle

This song is remarkable for being an instrumental radio hit. It came out in 1975 and quickly became a smash on dance floors and then airwaves across America.

4. I’m Your Boogie Man

This classic track appears on the soundtracks to Roll Bounce, The Watchmen, Superbad, and all five Scary Movie films. It’s from the band’s third album, 1976′s aptly titled Part 3. The track has even been covered by White Zombie for The Crow: City of Angels soundtrack.

3. Shake Your Booty

This was the first #1 pop hit to receive mainstream radio play for a song with the word “booty” in it. Due to the controversial nature of the word, and its perception as having a sexual connotation, there were naysyaers within the TK ranks who said it would never be a hit. Henry Stone refused to listen, decided it would be a smash, and promoted it as a single which successfully topped charts around the world in 1976. It changed the face of modern dance music and is still incredibly influential today.

2. Boogie Shoes

Ever since hitting it huge on the soundtrack to the Hollywood disco classic Saturday Night Fever in 1977, “Boogie Shoes” has been a timeless and unforgettable song. That album initially shipped 15 million copies, and spent 18 weeks as the number 1 album on the pop charts. It can be originally heard on the band’s self titled second album from 1975 as well as the movies No Escape (1994), Mallrats (1995), Boogie Nights (1997), Detroit Rock City (1999), and The Wedding Date (2005) . Miami rapper Trick Daddy sampled it for his song “Take It To Da House.”

1. Get Down Tonight

This was the first of KC & The Sunshine Band’s 5 songs to go number 1 on the pop charts. It has appeared in the movies Sid and Nancy (1986), Forrest Gump (1994), Rush Hour (1998), Deuce Bigalow Male Gigalo (1999), and Arlington Road (1999). The track was parodied by Beyonce Knowles in the Mike Myers film Austin Powers: Goldmember. It also plays in the video game Grand Theft Auto: Vice City (2002). It is noted for its very distinctive opening made by playing a guitar sol at 200% speed over a normal speed guitar track.

 

Sep 242013
 

#FromTheArchives

Cover image from a very special edition of Cashbox. In 1976, Cashbox, which was at the time one of the leading music magazines in the country, did a special edition commemorating Henry Stone, TK Records and his various sub-labels. Inside were numerous stories about the artists from Henry’s labels. It also had ads from all of the other music companies, distributors, record labels, publishers and retailers, congratulating Henry.

It is a very cool collection and if there is enough interest, we may post some of the interior stories and ads, as well.

Cashbox Cover Spec Ed TK Explosion